and the cans keep coming

Colonial can’t can fast enough and Cheeky Monkey have just released their own cans too!

Photo from Cheeky Monkey Facebook page

When it comes to craft beer everyone is talking about cans. It’s been a growing trend in the United States for a while and here in Australia we are happily embracing the tinny too!

Read: Washington Times – Yes we can, trendy American craft brewers say

Pirate Life Brewing in South Australia started brewing towards the end of last year and right from the beginning they committed their beers to cans. Also they created a fantastic infographic on why cans are great, I’ve nabbed it to post below but you can also click the image to go straight to the source.

Why Cans? Pirate Life Brewing

Here in WA we have seen Colonial Brewing delve into cans, first with their Draught Ale in November 2014 and followed by Small Ale about six months later. In nothing less than a positive and upbeat tone, it feels like Colonial’s cans have been around forever. Ordering a can of Small Ale just feels so natural and normal now! Chatting with head brewer Paul Wyman, he estimates they have produced 30,000L or 80,000 cans of Small Ale, no wonder it feels like it’s everywhere!

Though it seems like a bit of a staple now, Paul is still surprised at the demand for his Small cans (sorry, couldn’t help myself).

Colonial Small Ale cans

“This was a beer we created for ourselves so we could have a full flavoured beer but still drive around the expansive areas of the Margaret River region,” Paul says.

Two beers down, the big question is “what beer will Colonial put into cans next?” and it sounds like it is a pretty open question. There’s no shortage of excellent Colonial beers and of course there are plenty of ideas floating around the brewhouse, we’ll just have to wait and see. With any luck it won’t be too much of a wait, “fingers crossed we will have them all out by the end of next year!” Paul says.

Meanwhile over at Cheeky Monkey Brewery & Cidery they have recently released two of their beers, the Old Reliable Pale Ale and Blonde Capuchin Blonde Ale, plus the Crooked Tale Apple Cider in 330ml cans.

The Blonde Capuchin has a nice soft fruity body, a little nectarine sweetness and a crisp lime bitterness. The Old Reliable Pale Ale is dominated by citrus like lemon and grapefruit, grassy flavours and biscuity malt in the back.

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Photo from Cheeky Monkey Facebook page

Chatting with Cheeky Monkey’s head brewer Ross Terlick, he’s clearly stoked to see his beers wrapped in tin. It’s the result of eight months of planning and also resulted in a bit of a rebrand to clean up the look and feel of the logo.

Cheeky Monkey logo

Being both cheeky and helpful monkey’s, the back of the can gives a few notes on “see”, “smell” and “taste” plus the hops and malts used.

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The next beers to get the canning treatment are already planned with the popular mid-strength Travelling Monk set to go into 500ml cans. Ross also hopes to put some seasonal releases into the big 500ml cans and the more popular Southern Wailers beers may also get a release.

Read: Crafty Pint – Cheeky Monkey Cans

Cheeky Monkey’s website is currently under construction but check out their Facebook page for a list of can stockists.

 

Weekend Reading #49

For those lazy weekend mornings when you just want to stay in bed and catch up on a little reading – Weekend Reading is a weekly post with the articles I’ve enjoyed in the past seven days and hope that you will too.


Crafty Pint | The Big Issue: Ownership

A three parter exploring the issue of ownership when it comes to craft beer, a nicely presented infographic on what brands are owned by who in Australia and a blind tasting. A fantastic look at this very big issue with a measured view and a great panel of industry people to comment.

Craft Brewing Business | Colorado’s Big Choice Brewing Announces Use of Reclosable Cans

A can you can close? Isn’t that just a bottle? Well, no, not at all. This is interesting!

Draft Magazine | Who is this ‘Brett’?

I used to get confused about Brettanomyces. Now I think of comedian’s Steve Martin’s act – a wild and crazy guy – which helps me remember that Brettanomyces, aka Brett, is a wild yeast – oh that Brett, what a wild and crazy yeast. This is a great short introduction to brett.

Draft Magazine | Why the DOJ is investigating AB InBev

With the news that AB InBev has made a bid to buy fellow mega beer company SABMiller, the general consensus is that nothing good will come from this. Even though the U.S works on a different model to us, this is still very interesting in how they can use their power and influence to have a major impact on the industry and restrict their competition.

Weekend Reading #32

I love lounging in bed on weekends and catching up on all my favourite beery reading. From blogs to articles from the American craft beer scene and the best local beer news, there’s excellent reading material out there so every Friday I’m posting a list of the articles and blogs that have excited me.

Draft Magazine | Yeast & Bacteria 101 – Brettanomyces, Lactobacillus, Pediococcus

Oh yeah, talk a little yeast and bacteria to me and I’m a happy girl! Mostly because I am still wrapping my head around these magical things. This is a great article to break down “brett”, “lacto” and “pedio” in a way that even me, lacking a lot in the science department, can understand.

Pirate Life Brewing | Why Cans?

I recently interviewed Red, brewer and co-founder of Adelaide’s new Pirate Life Brewing, so I had a good look around their website. This graphic is a fantastic summary of why cans are great. Whilst you’re there though, take a look around the site, I love the way it’s written. It feels like your best friend wrote it, the tone is casual and fun and honest.

Draft Magazine | Let’s ban “hoppy” and “malty” from beer descriptions

A valid argument here. “Hoppy” and “malty” not only don’t tell a beer lover about the beer but they also exclude any one who isn’t familiar with hops and malts. It doesn’t need to be Shakespeare or war and peace but make it relatable and interesting.

Australian Brews News | Try It Thursday

I have been really enjoying this series by Pete Mitcham that each week puts a spotlight on an Australian craft beer. Reading them makes me thirsty!

Weekend Reading #24

This weeks articles cover off cans, aeroplane beers and the cost of beer … yup, the cost of beer is still a hot button topic

I love lounging in bed on weekends and catching up on all my favourite beery reading. From blogs to articles from the American craft beer scene and the best local beer news, there’s excellent reading material out there so every Friday I’m posting a list of the articles and blogs that have excited me.

Beer and Whiskey Brothers | Delta Complicates Craft Beer Offering as only an Airline Could

I saw this announcement a fair amount on Twitter, assuming it was around the time the press release was issued, and my first thought was “Oh Qantas executives, please read this and get cracking!” Maybe if we all wish really, really hard.

However, outside of the press release comes this piece on where and when the beers will be available and opinions on what beers have been chosen. It’s an interesting read from a more local perspective.

Colonial Cans

Dear Qantas Executives,

These are available now. They are brewed in Margaret River, they are tasty. Please call Colonial Brewing. Please also call Mountain Goat and Mornington Peninsula.

Many thanks, Pia aka I wish I could enjoy these on your flights

Sydney Morning Herald | Craft Beer: How much should you pay?

As always with these sorts of articles it is the comments at the end that are really eye opening. As I read them my fingers twitch over the keyboard, structured paragraphs form in my mind in but I resist the urge to type because even though I have my opinion I don’t want anything to do with such a circus of words. It does, however, make for interesting reading.

Incidentally, my answer to the headline is simple – there is no “should”, buy the bottle or don’t buy the bottle and this applies to domestic mainstream beer and premium craft and everything in between. One persons crazy is parting with $70 for a bottle of Nail Clout Stout, another persons crazy might be spending anything more than $20,000 on a car. There’s no right or wrong but there is being a bit of a dick and telling people they are stupid for enjoying things they like.

BRW | Craft Brewers Lead Canned Beer Comeback

Back to cans – here’s a nice little write up of Australian brewers who have been embracing their cans … and you should too!