Snapshot: Hop Harvest

Hanging out at Karridale Hop Farm for Hop Harvest

17 February 2018

I doubt I will ever get tired of looking at fresh hop cones, it’s a wonderful assault on your senses because they look fantastic, smell amazing and they even feel great. Sadly technology doesn’t allow you to smell and touch hops here but I can definitely show you lots and lots of hops. Sit back, scroll and enjoy these photos from my day hanging out during hop harvest at Karridale Hop Farm a few weeks ago.

You can read the full article I wrote about the day, including plans for the future of the hop farm, at Crafty Pint – A Day in the Life of: A Hop Farmer

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Welcome to Karridate Cottages and Hop Farm
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Trey, one half of Karridale Hop Farm, inspecting the bines
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Trey cutting the bottom of the bines, just under where the cones start to grow. A cheeky photobomb by my dog Barley in there too!
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Trey with a Cascade hop cone, analysis of his Cascade has come back with an Alpha Acid (the stuff that makes beer bitter) reading of 11.5%, huge for a variety that is normally 5-7%
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Trey cuts the hop bines at the top and then passes them to be loaded onto the ute
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More and more hop bines
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Ready to go!

 

Maker:S,Date:2017-9-14,Ver:6,Lens:Kan03,Act:Lar02,E-Y
But first, Trey does a little quality control
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Ken helps unload the bines, Ken comes by to lend a hand, quite fitting since he actually built the original cottages on the property
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Time to get the cones off the bine
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Slowly, slowly
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Fresh wet hops that, in this state, have about a 70% water content
Maker:S,Date:2017-9-14,Ver:6,Lens:Kan03,Act:Lar02,E-Y
So many hops!
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Time to get them into a tray, the wire bottom allows air flow. Trey writes the variety on the front.
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Loading up the hops
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It’s very much a team effort!
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Quality control

 

Maker:S,Date:2017-9-14,Ver:6,Lens:Kan03,Act:Lar02,E-Y
Mould is the biggest concern so you want an even layer of cones to ensure even drying
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Up Close: Pemberton ‘Wild Blend’, the variety is their own and grew in Pemberton until the mid to late 70s. Trey went looking for the plant, found some growing wild and brought it back to Karridale.
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Up Close: Perle
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Fuggles, named after the English noble hop variety
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Up Close: Pemberton Wild Blend from the tip of the cone
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Barley keeping an eye on things
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Up Close: Inside a hop cone, the golden coloured stuff is called lupulin which is where the acids, oils and resins are, basically all the good stuff brewers want
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Trays at loaded into the cabinet to dry
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Heaters are the bottom, extractor fans at the top, pulling hot air through the whole cabinet.
Maker:S,Date:2017-9-14,Ver:6,Lens:Kan03,Act:Lar02,E-Y
As each tray gets filled, each tray is rotated in the cabinet for even drying. The hops in each tray are also shuffled around. These cones will dry overnight, ready for a brewer to use soon!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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